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. the republican candidate vice president richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy >> reporter: they began just 52 years ago on september 26, 1960. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i hope he would grant me the same >> schieffer: some people who listened to it on the radio thought that nixon won but it was generally conceded that people who watched it on television were pretty convinced that jack kennedy won >> absolutely. what you say is important. but what you look like can be also as important >> mr. nixon, would you like to comment on that statement >> i have no comment and in nixon's case, he percent spired. he had the audacity to per spire. as a consequence, the venue where you are where a debate goes on, it's like a meat locker. that's the reason. they negotiate how cold it's going to be because nobody wants to per spire because look what happened to nixon. it's amazing. >> schieffer: even a great communicator like franklin roosevelt knew the risk of debating. he was a heavy favorite to win re-election in 1940, so when republican wende
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
gives you an idea of how much the country has changed in a good way. but, right after richard nixon became president, four vacancies appear on the supreme court. you never know how that will work. jimmy carter was the only proven to serve a full term without having a single nominee. but richard nixon was on the president for five and a half years. you will recall he had to leave early remember. [laughter] but he got for appointments in the supreme court because chief justice warren left, john hollen and hugo black left and they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger, harry blackmun, lewis powell and william rehnquist and as you think about that list, it illustrates the scene that i think is a very in part and part of the oath but it is the theme of american politics over the past generation and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it's the most important story in the supreme court because moderate republicans dominated the supreme court for two generations, and moderate republicans are gone. they
nixon the first person i turned to was cindy quinn who -- i was 20 at the time when i took over the library. sandy was 30. we have grown up together around the library. it's a wonderful to be back. i'm glad you mentioned my friend his book will be a tremendous best seller. so if you have a chance come back. he is in fact performing in memphis the weekend after next. he has a great role in memphis which will be at the pantages. a brilliant and wonderful speaker. come out to hear him. we've been friends since we were too. rao the city to the other radio in los angeles. like to point out that we're all graduates of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and comm
richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy >> reporter: they began just 52 years ago on september 26, 1960. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i hope he would grant me the same >> schieffer: some people who listened to it on the radio thought that nixon won but it was generally conceded that people who watched it on television were pretty convinced that jack kennedy won >> absolutely. what you say is important. but what you look like can be also as important >> mr. nixon, would you like to comment on that statement >> i have no comment and in nixon's case, he percent spired. he had the audacity to per spire. as a consequence, the venue where you are where a debate goes on, it's like a meat locker. that's the reason. they negotiate how cold it's going to be because nobody wants to per spire because look what happened to nixon. it's amazing. >> schieffer: even a great communicator like franklin roosevelt knew the risk of debating. he was a heavy favorite to win re-election in 1940, so when republican wendell wilke demanded a debate, f.d.
for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
of how much the country has changed in a good way. but right after richard nixon became president, for vacancies appeared on the sprinkler. you never know how that's going to work. jimmy carter is the only president in american history to serve a full term without having a single nominee. there were no vacations while he was there. richard nixon was only president for five and half years. he had to leave early, remember? [laughter] geek out for appointments because chief justice warren left. john hartman and hugo black left. they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger, harry blackmun, powell, and william rehnquist. and as you think about that list, it illustrates a theme that a think, it's a very important part of "the oath" but it is the theme of american politics over the past generation. and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it is the most important story in the supreme court. because modern republicans dominate the supreme court for two generations, and moderate republicans are gone. the
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
rate by election day. in 1968, humphry was down 15 points to nixon. nixon won and it was by less than 1%. in 19786, there was a 34-point lead over ford. after three debates ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll though narrowly lost. in 1980, jimmy carter had consistent advantage in the polls overarmed reagan but the final debate changed everything. polls showing a lead over romney in the key battleground states, democratic pollster who worked for jimmy carter said finding the right example can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others that republicans tend to respond to the polls less than often times. from the news organizations. less than do democrats. >> in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. dukakis was leading after the democratic convention but lost to bush. in 1992, the incumbent president was down nine points and died with bill clinton but october though clinton eventually won. former pollster questioning the assumption made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african-american, latino an yo
do. >>> the candidates need no introduction. the republican candidate vice president richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i would hope he would grant me the same. the question before us is, which point of view and which party do we want to lead the united states? >> mr. nixon, would you like to comment on that statement? >> i have no comment. >> the sweat pooling onyxen's chin while kennedy is over there cold chillin'. was the presidential race decided right there because of heavy perspiration on the vice presidential mug? can you see who won the first televised presidential debate with the sound off or is that an oversimplification of a slew of factor sfls do campaigns matter or does the man with the best platform for that moment in history actually win? our next guest studied the last six decades of campaignsin exploring thorg. how campaigns do and do not matter. christopher, how are you? >> great. >> i'm of the school that campaigns do matter. that you have to present your ideas and present
evaporate by election day. in 1968, hub bert humphrey was down 15 points to richard nixon. while nixon won it was by less than 1%. in 1976, jimmy carter had a lead over gerald ford. after three debates, ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll though narrowly lost. in 1980, carter maintained a consistent advantage over ronald reagan, but the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a reagan landslide. with polls now showing president obama building a lead over mitt romney in key battleground states, a democratic pollster and consultant who worked for jimmy carter says finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others, the republicans tend to respond to these polls less than oftentimes, particularly from news organizations, less than do democrats. >> in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. gallup had michael dukakis leading by 17 points after the democratic convention, but lost to bush by 7.5%. in 1992, the incumbent president was down nine points in mid-september, tied with bill clinton by the end of octob
. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon in 1960, even reagan and carter in 1980, the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked defensive. that's the impression that often lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush is a good example of body language so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effe effective, aggressive debater. he was seen in the first debate as too aggressive. the sighs and the rest. in the second debate he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a just right approach by that time. those performances and all the other factors in the 2000 election held him back. >> humor. >> humor can be very important but it's something that has to -- some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again, reagan, most people feel, was prepared. >> remember what lloyd benson said about -- >> yes. >> dan quayle. >> that famous line. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you are no jack kennedy. >> i just reread about
these other people were squabbling amongst each other. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon. even reagan and carter in 1980. the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked a little bit defensive. that's the impression that lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush i think is a good example of body language told so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effective, aggressive debater. in the first debate, he was seen as being too aggressive. the famous sighs and all the rest. in the second debate, he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a kind of just right approach, but by that time, those performances and all the other factors in the 2011 election held him back. >> how important is humor? >> it can be very important, but it's something that has to -- i guess some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again by reagan most people feel w prepared. that, of course, is the magic. >> remember what lloyd benson said about dan quayle and pres
with kennedy and nixon have not changed large groups of voters. if you are obama and make a big mistake or mitt romney comes up with one of my lines like where is the beef. look, i think obama has expectations way too high on debates. he hasn't debated in four years. >>neil: you are lowering the expectations. >>guest: i am trying my best because your audience, particularly, as massive as it; i want them to understand that mitt romney has had 24 debates and president obama has had none. >>neil: do you get along on "the five," or do you have food tasters? >>guest: we get along well. >>neil: i don't believe it. who do you hate the most? >>guest: i don't hate anyone. and i love you and all the people on "the five." the star of the "the five" is the show the >>neil: okay. i go along with that. day that was here trashing you yesterday. >>guest: if she was trashing me it was in jest because you trash me in real time and all i can say is, are we at the end of the segment yet? leave the gun and bring the cannoli. >>neil: thank you, sir. >> michael reagan says bob has it all wrong as far as the polls are
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
f. kennedy and richard nixon squared off in the very first televised debate. while nixon was known for being a fierce debater on camera he looked nervous, sweating profusely under the hot camera lights, whereas kennedy looked calm, cool, collected. forces those that watched the debate, kennedy was the winner, but for those who listened to the debate on radio, they thought nixon won. in the end it was kennedy who won the presidential race. well, of course, humor can also have an affect on the debates. 1908 ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president jimmy carter for his stance on health care, but reagan won fans with his response. check it out. >> governor reagan, again, typically is against such a proposal. >> governor, there you go again. >> all right. want to bring in presidential historian douglas brinkley. good to see you, as always. let's just start by seeing that moment. how significant was that between carter and reagan? >> oh, it was big. if you go back to 1980, you have jimmy carter, the sitting president, but he had double digit inflation, long gasoline lines, and iran
september leads can evaporate by election day. hubert humphrey was down 15 points to richard nixon. nixon won by less than 1%. jimmy carter had a lead over gerald ford. after three debates ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll and narrowly lost. the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a regan landslide. >> with polls now showing president obama building a lead over mitt romney in key battleground states a democratic pollster and consultant who worked for jimmy carter says finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others is that republicans tend to respond to the polls less than often times particularly from news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. gallup had michael dukakis leading by 17 points after the convention. the loss to bush by 7%. a former are clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african american, latino and young people vote in 2
say that it deserves. let's go back. richard nixon was forced out of office because he lied. and because he covered some stuff up. i'm going to be blunt and tell you this. nobody died in watergate. we have people dead because of this and there are questions to be answered and americans ought to demand to get answers. megyn: this this story potentially at that level? >> i don't know that it would reach that level. but i can tell you it's enough concern that democrats in the united states senate. and i know some democrats in the united states house are very concerned and i believe senator kerry said i want to learn more about this. what did you know and when did you not. there are questions not just coming from republican partisans. these are people who care about americans around the world and our national security policy. megyn: they sent that joint letter yesterday and the return date on the information requested is november 13, which is conspicuously after the presidential election. but they want answers both democrats and republicans as to what went on here. thanks so muc
that late september leads can evaporate by election day. in 1968 hubert humphrey was down 15 points. nixon won it was less than 1 percent. in 1976, jimmy carter had a 33-point lead over gerald ford. three debates, ford had cut the lead to 5 points and led in the final polls and narrowly lost. jamie carter had a consistent advantage over ronald reagan but the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a reagan landslide. now he is building a lead in key battleground states, a consultant who worked for jimmy carter, finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from exit polls that republicans tend to respond to these polls less than oftentimes particularly to news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in. >> julie: 8 there was a huge swing. dukakis lost to bush. in 1992 incumbent president was down nine points in mid-september and was tied with bill clinton by the end of october. the clinton eventually won. former clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level
i explored it i assumed that kennedy had beaten nixon decisively but it only moved the poll as couple of spots but it allowed kennedy to prove that he could be president, to pass the threshold. acceptability in stature. same thing with jimmy carter. carter would not have been president without debates and kennedy said he wouldn't have been. sometimes it works at wary. generally, and, reagan, one debate, it was decisive, with one debate in 1980 and the last week of the campaign, because it allowed reagan to prove he wasn't dangerous. for romney the debate is all about being able to prove if my opinion several things, but most importantly, that he is not a bad person. he has 90 minutes, the obama campaign has spent several million defining him in a way that he murders people, that he is grossly for the rich. >> what does romney have to do? >> he needs to articulate a plan as to what he will do to change america. pat is right, he has to make himself accessible to the american people. beyond that, unless people get a sense that he has a clear at stiff vision for the country and
that first televised debate when americans saw kennedy and nixon on t.v. the second was the year 2000 when george bush overtook vice president al gore. as john mentioned earlier in the show that does not mean it is time to get complacent. one thing romney could have going for him is that the jobs report is out just 36 hours after the first debate. more john fugelsang coming up on the full court press and we're always live in chat, join us there, current.com/billpress. you're about to watch an ad message created by a current tv viewer for capella university. matter. i've been a nurse since 1979. i love being a nurse. a few years ago a friend i went to grade school with showed me a book she had kept from third grade. i had written that i wanted to be a nurse. after being a nurse for about twenty years i decided that i need to further my education. my masters degree was done completely online and that gave me the freedom and ability to do my education while i raised my kids and worked full time. raising my kids as a single mom and having them see me get my education online and work opportunit
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)